Has The Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Been Ratified

The procedure for ratifying the VA by the EU is defined in Article 50 of the Treaty on european Union. It is a two-step process. The European Parliament must approve the agreement. The Council of the EU must then definitively approve the agreement by a qualified majority. The Council of the EU is made up of representatives of ministers from each member state. On Thursday evening, the member of the House of Commons ratified the government`s withdrawal agreement by 330 votes to 231. On the European Union side, the European Parliament also approved the ratification of the agreement on 29 January 2020[40] and the Council of the European Union approved the conclusion of the agreement by e-mail on 30 January 2020. [42] That is why, on 30 January 2020, the European Union also tabled its instrument for ratification of the agreement, concluding the agreement[43] and allowing it to enter into force on the date of the UK`s withdrawal from the EU on 31 January 2020, at 11 .m GMT. Shortly after the agreement, EU heads of state and government agreed. For an agreement with the United Kingdom, this would probably involve the conclusions of a European Council summit. The heads of state or government of the remaining 27 member states formally agreed that “sufficient progress” had been made to move to phase two: the post-Brexit transition period and the future trade relationship between the UK and the EU.

While Prime Minister Theresa May welcomed the decision, EU Council President Tusk has clumsily warned that the second phase of the talks would be “dramatically difficult.” The VA has already been approved by the heads of state or government of the Member States at the European Council. Voting in the Council is considered a formality. After an unprecedented vote on 4 December 2018, MEPs ruled that the UK government was not respecting Parliament because it refused to give Parliament full legal advice on the consequences of its proposed withdrawal terms. [29] The focus of the consultation was on the legal effect of the “backstop” agreement for Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom with regard to the CUSTOMS border between the EU and the United Kingdom and its impact on the Good Friday agreement that led to the end of the unrest in Northern Ireland, including whether , according to the proposals, the UK would be certain that it would be able to leave the EU in a practical sense. The Northern Ireland Protocol, known as the Irish Backstop, was an annex to the November 2018 draft agreement outlining provisions to avoid a hard border in Ireland after the UK`s withdrawal from the European Union. The protocol provided for a provision of the safety net to deal with the circumstances in which satisfactory alternative arrangements were to come into force at the end of the transition period. This project has been replaced by a new protocol that will be described as follows. The UK left the EU on 31 January 2020 at midnight (23:00 GMT). A transitional period is now in effect until 31 December 2020.

During this period, all EU laws and regulations continue to apply in the UK. For businesses and the public, virtually nothing will change. This will give everyone more time to prepare for the new agreements that the EU and the UK intend to conclude after 31 December 2020. The European Council (Article 50) confirmed that “sufficient progress” had been made in moving to the second phase of the negotiations. On the issue of the Irish border, there is a protocol on Northern Ireland (the “backstop”) which is attached to the agreement and establishes a position of withdrawal which will only come into force in the absence of effective alternative provisions before the expiry of the transition period. In this case, the UK will eclipse the EU`s common external tariff and Northern Ireland will stick to aspects of the internal market until such an event is carried out. Neither party can unilaterally withdraw from this customs union. The aim of this backstop agreement is to avoid a “hard” border in Ireland, where customs controls are needed. [19] EU leaders approve postponement of dat